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Paul Gross on Madness and the Creative ProcessBy Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail
Stratford Festival’s second annual Shakespeare Slam includes a one-man cabaret-rock performance by Hawsley Workman, but the main event is a debate inspired by the theme of this year’s festival, Madness: Minds Pushed to the Edge. Participants include academics, professionals and singer-songwriter Steven Page (who has suffered from depression) and actor Paul Gross (famed for his portrayal of a mentally overwrought artistic director in the miniseries Slings and Arrows). We spoke to the latter.
The subject of this year’s debate is whether or not madness is inherent in the artistic process. Who’s on which side?
Steven is arguing that madness is not required as part of the creative process. And I’m arguing that it is. Neither of us are in any position to comment with any certainty, and I don’t feel I’m an authority on mental illness per se. But I can talk about the creative process, which does have altered states involved in it. I’m actually not sure exactly what Steven’s argument is going to be. Just that I’m wrong, I’m sure.
Can you give us an idea of what your argument will be?
First, I would define madness as being slightly different from mental illness. I think madness is more closely aligned with shamanism or berserkers or oracles. I think most artists who are any good at their trade – and even those who aren’t – go into a kind of altered state where your proper self recedes to the background and you can receive creative inspiration. It goes back to as far as we can look, and it’s part of the process. But it’s manageable. Or, at its best, it should be managed so that you can enter the state, return from the state, and your consciousness comes back to the foreground and tries to make sense of what you’ve discovered.
Gord Downie has said that his goal as a songwriter is to get out of his own way. Is that the same as the altered state you’re talking about?
I think so. With the governor, the thing that controls you, you have to somehow put it in a closet for a little while, and then open it up and bring it back. I know that Kurt Vonnegut said the trick to writing, for him, was to get rid of his big brain. And yet, he does have to bring back that big brain to edit what he’s written. It’s being able to go in and out fluidly, and being able to call upon whatever you call the muse.
Getting into actual mental illnesses, what about the appeal of the so-called tortured artist?
Authenticity in an artist is what people respond to. But I think it’s a bit mixed up, and for few centuries there’s a been a romantic notion of the tortured artist. It can be difficult for audiences and artists to be able to separate a mental-health problem from inspiration. I don’t think they are aligned necessarily.
So, you’re not contending that artists with a mental illness have this weird reservoir of special inspiration or anything?
Right, that’s not what at all what I’ll be arguing for. But that an artist finds, and uses as a tool, states that are akin to mental illness.
Shakespeare Slam happens April 23, 8 p.m. $29 to $54. Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., 416-408-0208, 1-800-567-1600 or tickets.rcmusic.ca.

For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog 

Paul Gross on Madness and the Creative Process
By Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail

Stratford Festival’s second annual Shakespeare Slam includes a one-man cabaret-rock performance by Hawsley Workman, but the main event is a debate inspired by the theme of this year’s festival, Madness: Minds Pushed to the Edge. Participants include academics, professionals and singer-songwriter Steven Page (who has suffered from depression) and actor Paul Gross (famed for his portrayal of a mentally overwrought artistic director in the miniseries Slings and Arrows). We spoke to the latter.

The subject of this year’s debate is whether or not madness is inherent in the artistic process. Who’s on which side?

Steven is arguing that madness is not required as part of the creative process. And I’m arguing that it is. Neither of us are in any position to comment with any certainty, and I don’t feel I’m an authority on mental illness per se. But I can talk about the creative process, which does have altered states involved in it. I’m actually not sure exactly what Steven’s argument is going to be. Just that I’m wrong, I’m sure.

Can you give us an idea of what your argument will be?

First, I would define madness as being slightly different from mental illness. I think madness is more closely aligned with shamanism or berserkers or oracles. I think most artists who are any good at their trade – and even those who aren’t – go into a kind of altered state where your proper self recedes to the background and you can receive creative inspiration. It goes back to as far as we can look, and it’s part of the process. But it’s manageable. Or, at its best, it should be managed so that you can enter the state, return from the state, and your consciousness comes back to the foreground and tries to make sense of what you’ve discovered.

Gord Downie has said that his goal as a songwriter is to get out of his own way. Is that the same as the altered state you’re talking about?

I think so. With the governor, the thing that controls you, you have to somehow put it in a closet for a little while, and then open it up and bring it back. I know that Kurt Vonnegut said the trick to writing, for him, was to get rid of his big brain. And yet, he does have to bring back that big brain to edit what he’s written. It’s being able to go in and out fluidly, and being able to call upon whatever you call the muse.

Getting into actual mental illnesses, what about the appeal of the so-called tortured artist?

Authenticity in an artist is what people respond to. But I think it’s a bit mixed up, and for few centuries there’s a been a romantic notion of the tortured artist. It can be difficult for audiences and artists to be able to separate a mental-health problem from inspiration. I don’t think they are aligned necessarily.

So, you’re not contending that artists with a mental illness have this weird reservoir of special inspiration or anything?

Right, that’s not what at all what I’ll be arguing for. But that an artist finds, and uses as a tool, states that are akin to mental illness.

Shakespeare Slam happens April 23, 8 p.m. $29 to $54. Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., 416-408-0208, 1-800-567-1600 or tickets.rcmusic.ca.




For more mental health news, 
Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog 

Filed under paul gross theater theatre shakespeare creative creativity art artist writer write mad madness creative process steven page depression depressed major depression mental illness mental health mental illness health healthy mind psychology psychiatry body brain artists canada

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The Play that Wants to Change the Way we Treat Mental IllnessBy Laura Barnett, The Guardian
The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland is based on a new approach called ‘open dialogue’, and replicates the experience of having an auditory hallucination.
Can theatre offer a cure for psychosis? It’s unlikely – and it would be unwise for any theatre-maker even to try. What theatre can do, though, is convey the experience of psychosis: the hallucinations and delusions – often terrifying, sometimes comical – that define reality for those withschizophrenia and related conditions.
This, at least, is the belief shared by David Woods and Jon Haynes, co-founders of the theatre company Ridiculusmus. Their new show, The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland, examines the effects of psychosis on several members of a fictional family, using an innovative conceit. The audience is split in two, with each half sitting on either side of a dividing wall. For the first act, each half of the audience watches one scene, while another scene is performed on the other side. Later, the audiences swap places; and in the final section, the wall becomes transparent, so that both halves of the audience are watching the same scene.
The effect, at least at first, is bewildering – and that is the point. “It’s as if you’re having auditory hallucinations,” Woods tells me when we meet during rehearsals at the Basement in Brighton, where the play is beginning a national tour. “Initially it’ll be overwhelming, chaotic. Then the audience will go out of the theatre, change sides. Slowly the voices will settle into place. In a way, it’s the same with schizophrenia. You don’t get cured, but you can recover.”
Woods and Haynes know more about schizophrenia and psychosis than most. Haynes was sectioned in the mid-80s, and spent six months as a patient in London’s Maudsley Hospital; Woods was a carer for several family members with mental health problems. It was this that first drew them towards making a show about mental illness: a series of early improvisations on the subject of family (the company devise all their work through improvisation and extensive research) threw up memories from their own pasts.
They contacted the Tavistock clinic in London, where they took part in a workshop on child carers for adults with mental health issues. It was there that they first learned about "open dialogue": a revolutionary approach to the treatment of psychosis that has, over the past few decades, virtually eradicated the condition in Western Lapland, the area of Finland where it originated.
Intrigued, Woods and Haynes travelled to the Keropudas hospital in Tornio, Finland, where Dr Jaakko Seikkula first evolved the method - and were so struck by what they found that they decided to make open dialogue the key subject of their show. “I thought: ‘Wow, this is wonderful,’” Haynes explains. “I can imagine that if we’d had this kind of approach [in the UK] years ago, things might have been very different for me. When I was ill, I remember feeling very much that I was the problem. With open dialogue, that’s not at all how the patient feels.”
Open dialogue is, as the name suggests, a treatment based on talking rather than medicating, and on intervening as early as possible in a psychotic episode. Families are directly involved in the patient’s therapy, with the aim of identifying the skewed dynamics, or other sources of emotional tension, that may have caused the patient’s crisis. “The idea,” Seikkula tells me over Skype, “is to organise the psychiatric system in a way that makes it possible to meet immediately in a crisis, and work very intensively together with the family.”
The statistics on open dialogue are startling: according to a 2003 study conducted at Keropudas hospital, 82% of patients who were given open-dialogue treatment had no, or mild, psychotic symptoms after five years, compared to 50% in a comparison group. The method has attracted international attention – in 2011, Seikkula helped found the Institute for Dialogic Practice in Massachusetts, to take open dialogue to the US. But it still remains far from the mainstream in many countries, including the UK.
The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland has open dialogue as an underlying theme, inherent in the idea of an audience listening to a family’s experience of psychosis, much as a psychiatrist might do during an open-dialogue session. Each scene begins with a group of disembodied voices describing the principles of the method, and the psychiatrist character in the play mentions the fact that a colleague in the NHS has been struck off for using open dialogue in the place of anti-psychotic medication.
Haynes and Woods’ key aims are to raise awareness of open dialogue, and to dispel the wider stigma surrounding schizophrenia. “I would hope,” Woods says, “that people who see the show would start listening: talking to each other rather than just barging their way through life. And that they would realise that there is a lot more to schizophrenia than just the tiny minority who go out and stab somebody with a knife.”
Seikkula, too, believes that a piece of theatre such as this has a powerful role to play in expressing what he, and other practitioners of open dialogue, consider the fundamental definition of psychosis. “Psychosis belongs to life,” he says. “In my mind, we can all have hallucinations. If we are in a stressful enough situation, each of us can react in that way. This play gives people a very concrete experience of how that really is.”
The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland is touring the UK. See ridiculusmus.com for full details.

For more information on Open Dialogue, see opendialogueapproach.co.uk

 


For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

The Play that Wants to Change the Way we Treat Mental Illness
By Laura Barnett, The Guardian

The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland is based on a new approach called ‘open dialogue’, and replicates the experience of having an auditory hallucination.

Can theatre offer a cure for psychosis? It’s unlikely – and it would be unwise for any theatre-maker even to try. What theatre can do, though, is convey the experience of psychosis: the hallucinations and delusions – often terrifying, sometimes comical – that define reality for those withschizophrenia and related conditions.

This, at least, is the belief shared by David Woods and Jon Haynes, co-founders of the theatre company Ridiculusmus. Their new show, The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland, examines the effects of psychosis on several members of a fictional family, using an innovative conceit. The audience is split in two, with each half sitting on either side of a dividing wall. For the first act, each half of the audience watches one scene, while another scene is performed on the other side. Later, the audiences swap places; and in the final section, the wall becomes transparent, so that both halves of the audience are watching the same scene.

The effect, at least at first, is bewildering – and that is the point. “It’s as if you’re having auditory hallucinations,” Woods tells me when we meet during rehearsals at the Basement in Brighton, where the play is beginning a national tour. “Initially it’ll be overwhelming, chaotic. Then the audience will go out of the theatre, change sides. Slowly the voices will settle into place. In a way, it’s the same with schizophrenia. You don’t get cured, but you can recover.”

Woods and Haynes know more about schizophrenia and psychosis than most. Haynes was sectioned in the mid-80s, and spent six months as a patient in London’s Maudsley Hospital; Woods was a carer for several family members with mental health problems. It was this that first drew them towards making a show about mental illness: a series of early improvisations on the subject of family (the company devise all their work through improvisation and extensive research) threw up memories from their own pasts.

They contacted the Tavistock clinic in London, where they took part in a workshop on child carers for adults with mental health issues. It was there that they first learned about "open dialogue": a revolutionary approach to the treatment of psychosis that has, over the past few decades, virtually eradicated the condition in Western Lapland, the area of Finland where it originated.

Intrigued, Woods and Haynes travelled to the Keropudas hospital in Tornio, Finland, where Dr Jaakko Seikkula first evolved the method - and were so struck by what they found that they decided to make open dialogue the key subject of their show. “I thought: ‘Wow, this is wonderful,’” Haynes explains. “I can imagine that if we’d had this kind of approach [in the UK] years ago, things might have been very different for me. When I was ill, I remember feeling very much that I was the problem. With open dialogue, that’s not at all how the patient feels.”

Open dialogue is, as the name suggests, a treatment based on talking rather than medicating, and on intervening as early as possible in a psychotic episode. Families are directly involved in the patient’s therapy, with the aim of identifying the skewed dynamics, or other sources of emotional tension, that may have caused the patient’s crisis. “The idea,” Seikkula tells me over Skype, “is to organise the psychiatric system in a way that makes it possible to meet immediately in a crisis, and work very intensively together with the family.”

The statistics on open dialogue are startling: according to a 2003 study conducted at Keropudas hospital, 82% of patients who were given open-dialogue treatment had no, or mild, psychotic symptoms after five years, compared to 50% in a comparison group. The method has attracted international attention – in 2011, Seikkula helped found the Institute for Dialogic Practice in Massachusetts, to take open dialogue to the US. But it still remains far from the mainstream in many countries, including the UK.

The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland has open dialogue as an underlying theme, inherent in the idea of an audience listening to a family’s experience of psychosis, much as a psychiatrist might do during an open-dialogue session. Each scene begins with a group of disembodied voices describing the principles of the method, and the psychiatrist character in the play mentions the fact that a colleague in the NHS has been struck off for using open dialogue in the place of anti-psychotic medication.

Haynes and Woods’ key aims are to raise awareness of open dialogue, and to dispel the wider stigma surrounding schizophrenia. “I would hope,” Woods says, “that people who see the show would start listening: talking to each other rather than just barging their way through life. And that they would realise that there is a lot more to schizophrenia than just the tiny minority who go out and stab somebody with a knife.”

Seikkula, too, believes that a piece of theatre such as this has a powerful role to play in expressing what he, and other practitioners of open dialogue, consider the fundamental definition of psychosis. “Psychosis belongs to life,” he says. “In my mind, we can all have hallucinations. If we are in a stressful enough situation, each of us can react in that way. This play gives people a very concrete experience of how that really is.”

The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland is touring the UK. See ridiculusmus.com for full details.

For more information on Open Dialogue, see opendialogueapproach.co.uk

 





For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

Filed under mental illness mental health mental illness health healthy wellness schizophrenia psychosis psychotic mind body brain theater play art artist creative news diagnosis disorder hallucination hallucinations recovery mad madness playwright playwriting psychology psychiatry

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artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artist artists tumblart art on tumblr artist on tumblr artists on tumblr tumblr art tumblr artistic creative creativity psychology psych psychiatry psychological extreme edge art from the edge gallery online aesthetic decorative style stylish draw drawing paint painter painting

175 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artist creative creativity artists community artists on tumblr paint painting photo photography music musical song songs track video film short film short story short story fiction non fiction extreme edge psychological psychology hope hopeful state

175 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artist creative creativity extreme edge artfromtheedge visual written write paint painting draw drawing digital photo photography video youtube artists community artistsontumblr artistontumblr tumblr facebook experience experiences trauma traumatic ptsd grief

175 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artist artists artists on tumblr artists_community artistsoninstagram creative creativity creation write written text book novel short story story poem poetry poet mixed mixed media submit submission submissions paint painting photo photography collage draw

15 notes

[Article of Interest] Unmasking the agony: Combat troops turn to art therapyBy Bill Briggs, NBC News contributor
The skull’s left corner is gone, leaving a jagged, diagonal edge drenched in red. The eyes are black and frantic. All of it resembles the Iraqi man who, in his final minute alive, stared up at Maj. Jeff Hall.
For five years, that face tortured Hall, once a sharp Army leader later shoved to his own ragged edge. Not long ago, a woman handed Hall a blank mask, brushes and paints. She asked him to see what may emerge on the surface.
“That image, seared into my mind, began leaking out of me,” said Hall, one of hundreds of active-duty troops who have created masks as part of an art therapy program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “I almost needed to regurgitate it. To be honest, it helped me let it go.”
Many more masks, some resembling Hall’s violent creation, some depicting abstract demons, adorn walls at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICOE) on the Walter Reed campus.
They reveal scars once carried and cloaked inside the minds of men and women back from war — troops diagnosed with mild brain injuries and secondary psychological issues, including post-combat stress.
Hall, 43, who titled his mask “The Shock of Death,” served a pair of year-long tours in Iraq spanning 2003 to 2005. Ultimately haunted by violent events he saw and survived in Iraq, including the loss of friends, Hall eventually contemplated suicide and became more isolated. His commander noticed Hall’s behavioral changes and guided him into counseling in 2008. Two years later, Hall was invited to seek treatment for a traumatic brain injury at then-new NICOE, a Department of Defense facility offering research, education and treatment focused on TBIs and psychological health. 
When service members initially enter the art-therapy studio, their faces often are blank and unyielding, hiding unwelcome war souvenirs within — the mental cargo they’ve lugged home but can’t shake. On their masks, they expose that secret turmoil: vulnerabilities, anger, grief or, often, fragmented identities.
“It’s intense. They get really invested in this. It becomes very meaningful for them,” said Melissa Walker, an art therapist who coordinates the masks program at NICOE.
Participants at NICOE must be active-duty troops who are dealing with a combination of TBI and psychological health concerns. Typically, they are referred by their primary health care provider or their commander. A designated team at NICOE determines which service members are most appropriate to receive treatment there. Attendees participate for four weeks. Art therapy is just one of the tools offered and the service members usually make one mask — done during their first week at the center. 
“I tell them: ‘Don’t worry about the finished product; worry about what you are symbolizing in the mask.’ That makes it more powerful to them. It gives them a way to express to us, visually, what they’re going through,” Walker said. “It’s a little less intimidating then handing them a blank piece of paper.”
Art therapy has become a staple in the treatment of a wide array of traumas, from child abuse to PTSD. Making art can help people unlock dark emotions or memories that they can’t yet vocalize, pulling those buried anxieties from their subconscious and placing them onto a canvass or into a lump of clay, said Donna Betts, a professor in the art therapy program at George Washington University.
As a patients’ pieces are taking shape, art therapists help them talk about what they believe they are trying to express in their creations, Betts said.   
“It’s especially effective in the treatment of trauma in service members. When trauma is experienced, it tends to be stored in the nonverbal part of the brain,” Betts said. “This is why so many of them can’t even put into words what they’ve been through. Art therapy helps them retell their story through art. It translate that trauma from the nonverbal part of the brain to the verbal part so they can start dealing with it.
“They then become more aware of the trauma. This is where that healing starts to take place.”
After the paint is dabbed and stroked at NICOE, many of those papier-mache masks offer chilling accounts of what it is like to live inside the minds of combat veterans.
One brown face with the mouth agape and with bloodshot eyes upturned is squeezed by a metal clamp that reads “TBI” on the left and “PTSD” on the right.
Another mask is coated by small chunks of amber bark — two tiny holes remain for eyes — symbolizing the outer camouflage the maker felt is necessary to blend back into the civilian world.
Some masks show mouths locked or sewn closed, whispering of an inability to speak of what they’ve witnessed. Many are divided down the middle — for example, one displays part of an American flag on the left and a skull on the right.
“There is a split sense of self. They feel like they’re one person when they’re deployed and one person when they return home,” Walker said. “Or, they do a really strong, warrior exterior with a vulnerable inside but they don’t feel like they can express that.”
The troops who come to NICOE for therapy can take their masks home. But many purposely leave them to hang from the walls to speak to — and perhaps even soothe — incoming troops trying to cope with the same thoughts and impulses.
The creations give service members a format “to say what they can’t say out loud — because it’s too painful or because we just don’t feel like anybody really wants to hear it,” said Hall, who remains on active duty, stationed at Rock Island Arsenal in northwestern Illinois.
“I absolutely believe it is a method to calm your mind.”For more mental health-related news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

[Article of Interest] Unmasking the agony: Combat troops turn to art therapy
By Bill Briggs, NBC News contributor

The skull’s left corner is gone, leaving a jagged, diagonal edge drenched in red. The eyes are black and frantic. All of it resembles the Iraqi man who, in his final minute alive, stared up at Maj. Jeff Hall.

For five years, that face tortured Hall, once a sharp Army leader later shoved to his own ragged edge. Not long ago, a woman handed Hall a blank mask, brushes and paints. She asked him to see what may emerge on the surface.

That image, seared into my mind, began leaking out of me,” said Hall, one of hundreds of active-duty troops who have created masks as part of an art therapy program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “I almost needed to regurgitate it. To be honest, it helped me let it go.”

Many more masks, some resembling Hall’s violent creation, some depicting abstract demons, adorn walls at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICOE) on the Walter Reed campus.

They reveal scars once carried and cloaked inside the minds of men and women back from war — troops diagnosed with mild brain injuries and secondary psychological issues, including post-combat stress.

Hall, 43, who titled his mask “The Shock of Death,” served a pair of year-long tours in Iraq spanning 2003 to 2005. Ultimately haunted by violent events he saw and survived in Iraq, including the loss of friends, Hall eventually contemplated suicide and became more isolated. His commander noticed Hall’s behavioral changes and guided him into counseling in 2008. Two years later, Hall was invited to seek treatment for a traumatic brain injury at then-new NICOE, a Department of Defense facility offering research, education and treatment focused on TBIs and psychological health. 

When service members initially enter the art-therapy studio, their faces often are blank and unyielding, hiding unwelcome war souvenirs within — the mental cargo they’ve lugged home but can’t shake. On their masks, they expose that secret turmoil: vulnerabilities, anger, grief or, often, fragmented identities.

“It’s intense. They get really invested in this. It becomes very meaningful for them,” said Melissa Walker, an art therapist who coordinates the masks program at NICOE.

Participants at NICOE must be active-duty troops who are dealing with a combination of TBI and psychological health concerns. Typically, they are referred by their primary health care provider or their commander. A designated team at NICOE determines which service members are most appropriate to receive treatment there. Attendees participate for four weeks. Art therapy is just one of the tools offered and the service members usually make one mask — done during their first week at the center. 

“I tell them: ‘Don’t worry about the finished product; worry about what you are symbolizing in the mask.’ That makes it more powerful to them. It gives them a way to express to us, visually, what they’re going through,” Walker said. “It’s a little less intimidating then handing them a blank piece of paper.”

Art therapy has become a staple in the treatment of a wide array of traumas, from child abuse to PTSD. Making art can help people unlock dark emotions or memories that they can’t yet vocalize, pulling those buried anxieties from their subconscious and placing them onto a canvass or into a lump of clay, said Donna Betts, a professor in the art therapy program at George Washington University.

As a patients’ pieces are taking shape, art therapists help them talk about what they believe they are trying to express in their creations, Betts said.   

It’s especially effective in the treatment of trauma in service members. When trauma is experienced, it tends to be stored in the nonverbal part of the brain,” Betts said. “This is why so many of them can’t even put into words what they’ve been through. Art therapy helps them retell their story through art. It translate that trauma from the nonverbal part of the brain to the verbal part so they can start dealing with it.

They then become more aware of the trauma. This is where that healing starts to take place.”

After the paint is dabbed and stroked at NICOE, many of those papier-mache masks offer chilling accounts of what it is like to live inside the minds of combat veterans.

One brown face with the mouth agape and with bloodshot eyes upturned is squeezed by a metal clamp that reads “TBI” on the left and “PTSD” on the right.

Another mask is coated by small chunks of amber bark — two tiny holes remain for eyes — symbolizing the outer camouflage the maker felt is necessary to blend back into the civilian world.

Some masks show mouths locked or sewn closed, whispering of an inability to speak of what they’ve witnessed. Many are divided down the middle — for example, one displays part of an American flag on the left and a skull on the right.

There is a split sense of self. They feel like they’re one person when they’re deployed and one person when they return home,” Walker said. “Or, they do a really strong, warrior exterior with a vulnerable inside but they don’t feel like they can express that.”

The troops who come to NICOE for therapy can take their masks home. But many purposely leave them to hang from the walls to speak to — and perhaps even soothe — incoming troops trying to cope with the same thoughts and impulses.

The creations give service members a format “to say what they can’t say out loud — because it’s too painful or because we just don’t feel like anybody really wants to hear it,” said Hall, who remains on active duty, stationed at Rock Island Arsenal in northwestern Illinois.

I absolutely believe it is a method to calm your mind.”



For more mental health-related news, 
Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

Filed under trauma ptsd post traumatic post traumatic stress disorder military service art artistic creative creativity therapy treatment therapeutic art therapy brain neuroscience science news research health mental health disorder dsm dsm 4 dsm 5 traumatic combat psychology psychological psychiatry

175 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artist artistic collage video paint painting media mixedmedia mixed media poem poet poetry write written visual visually visualart artontumblr art on tumblr tumblart fiction nonfiction non fiction youtube social media socialmedia gallery edge extreme

175 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. All of the art shown on this flyer has been featured on the blog.

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art artwork artist artistic creative creation creativity edge extreme visual video fiction poem poetry write writing collage psychoanalysis psychology psychiatry psychiatric outsider drug drugs medication meds psychosis psychotic schizophrenia schizophrenic

184 notes

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?
The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. 
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

HAVE YOU CREATED ART IN OR ABOUT AN EXTREME STATE?

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, photography, video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. 

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under Art Artists on Tumblr Nail Art Crafts Science News Poetry History Film Music extreme edge drug drugs creative creativity spirit state states spiritual depressed depression bipolar bipolarity personal story stories write writing novel

21 notes

artfromtheedge:

[Article of Interest] Edward Deeds, Outsider Artist, Leaves Behind Hauntingly Innocent Drawings From Mental Institution By Priscilla Frank”The artist really should be lost to history, and certainly these drawings should,” said curator Tom Parker of his upcoming exhibition. The works in question are by Edward Deeds, a mental patient at Missouri State Hospital for almost 40 years. The show, entitled, “Talisman of the Ward: The Album of Drawings by Edward Deeds,” presents 30 works by the outsider artist.Deeds, who was diagnosed with dementia praecox and schizophrenia, was committed to a mental institution in 1936. Beyond this fact we know little about his condition, personality or life, although the curator sees all he needs to in Deeds’ artwork. “The images have one fabulous clue on every page,” Parker explained to the Huffington Post. “State Lunatic Asylum, written on the paper by the hospital. One poetic detail which encapsulates everything you need to know about the artist and his circumstance.”The artist’s drawings, crafted on the official hospital stationary, radiate a remarkable innocence given the circumstances of their creation. Whimsical lions, wide-eyed characters and vintage vehicles comprise a pictorial land far beyond the mental facility walls. The only reminder of Deeds’ dark reality is recurrence of the letters “ECT,” a likely acronym for the controversial shock treatment known as electroconvulsive therapy.At the time of Deeds’ death he gave his collection of drawings to his mother, who then passed them to her other son, who stored them in his attic. Years later, the drawings were tossed out to a curbside junk pile and were discovered by a 14-year-old boy who became fascinated with them. He kept the works safe for 36 years.The precious drawings, both unpretentious and cryptic, present an idyllic vision from a mysterious perspective. The story of their creation and survival is as magnetic as the raw emotion in his innocent crayon strokes.
“Talisman of the Ward: The Album of Drawings by Edward Deeds” will show from January 10 until February 9, 2013 at Hirschl & Adler Modern.

artfromtheedge:

[Article of Interest] Edward Deeds, Outsider Artist, Leaves Behind Hauntingly Innocent Drawings From Mental Institution
By Priscilla Frank

The artist really should be lost to history, and certainly these drawings should,” said curator Tom Parker of his upcoming exhibition. The works in question are by Edward Deeds, a mental patient at Missouri State Hospital for almost 40 years. The show, entitled, “Talisman of the Ward: The Album of Drawings by Edward Deeds,” presents 30 works by the outsider artist.

Deeds, who was diagnosed with dementia praecox and schizophrenia, was committed to a mental institution in 1936. Beyond this fact we know little about his condition, personality or life, although the curator sees all he needs to in Deeds’ artwork. “The images have one fabulous clue on every page,” Parker explained to the Huffington Post. “State Lunatic Asylum, written on the paper by the hospital. One poetic detail which encapsulates everything you need to know about the artist and his circumstance.”
The artist’s drawings, crafted on the official hospital stationary, radiate a remarkable innocence given the circumstances of their creation. Whimsical lions, wide-eyed characters and vintage vehicles comprise a pictorial land far beyond the mental facility walls. The only reminder of Deeds’ dark reality is recurrence of the letters “ECT,” a likely acronym for the controversial shock treatment known as electroconvulsive therapy.
At the time of Deeds’ death he gave his collection of drawings to his mother, who then passed them to her other son, who stored them in his attic. Years later, the drawings were tossed out to a curbside junk pile and were discovered by a 14-year-old boy who became fascinated with them. He kept the works safe for 36 years.
The precious drawings, both unpretentious and cryptic, present an idyllic vision from a mysterious perspective. The story of their creation and survival is as magnetic as the raw emotion in his innocent crayon strokes.

“Talisman of the Ward: The Album of Drawings by Edward Deeds” will show from January 10 until February 9, 2013 at Hirschl & Adler Modern.

Filed under Art Artists on Tumblr Crafts News History Science Neuroscience consciousness schizophrenia schizophrenic antipsychotic isps psychiatric psychiatry psychoanalysis psychological psychology psychopathology psychopharmacology psychosis psychotherapy psychotic art article mental mental illness treatment edward deeds gallery

92 notes

[Documentary of Interest] People Say I’m Crazy

Making this film was my idea.

At the beginning, when I had my psychotic break in college, I did not know what was happening with me. I thought that by filming I could explore my illness and try to understand what was going on.

I filmed everything—from being catatonic to when I had ECT (electro-convulsive, or electroshock therapy).

Later on I kept filming because I was so angry about how much misinformation there is about brain diseases like mine.  I wanted the world to know what it’s like to live with labels such as “psychotic,” “schizophrenic” and “severely disabled.”

I wanted to let the world know what it is really like to live with schizophrenia.

- John Cadigan

People Say I’m Crazy is the only film about schizophrenia ever made by someone with schizophrenia. Mental illness is viewed from the inside out as the audience becomes witness to a first-hand account of the symptoms of schizophrenia and the disease’s effect on one man and his family. [It] has been hailed as a unique, powerful, and ultimately optimistic statement on coping with schizophrenia, challenging stereotypes and humanizing an often misunderstood illness.

The Story
This film tells the story of a young man, John Cadigan, who develops schizophrenia at age 21 while studying art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Initially devastated by his diagnosis, John eventually finds appropriate treatment and works his way into recovery, with the help of family and friends. The spotlight is also turned on John’s family as they struggle to understand John’s disease. With courage and love, the family learns how to support John in his efforts to resume living an independent and fulfilling life. By the film’s conclusion, John rejoins his family and community, fulfills his dream of launching his career as an artist, and—an important accomplishment for those who suffer from schizophrenia—moves into his own apartment to begin living an independent life.


The Filmmaker: John Cadigan
John made the film with the help of his sister, filmmaker Katie Cadigan, and Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker, Ira Wohl. John filmed his life for over 10 years—from when he had his first psychotic episode at age 21 until he was well into recovery a decade later. Throughout the process, he managed to record his story despite the cognitive and emotional difficulties created by his disease.

Filed under Science Art Artists on Tumblr News Film History documentary psychotic illness ect schizophrenia schizophrenic disabled ira wohl antipsychotic psychiatric psychiatry psychoanalysis psychological psychology psychopathology psychopharmacology psychotherapy Neuroscience crazy Crafts Mad madness recovery

12 notes

artfromtheedge:

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, music,  photography, crafts,  video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. 
Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.
Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.
Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 
submissions@artfromtheedge.net
artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge:

The creators of the Serious Mental Illness blog invite you to submit your visual art, music,  photography, crafts,  video work, poetry, collage, or short fiction to Art from the Edge. 

Art from the Edge, a virtual gallery and resource center, is dedicated to art created in and about extreme mental states. It is an open and public world wide forum for artists to share their visual and written works and their personal stories with all those interested in the connection between creativity and “edge” states.

Much like art, which exists in a multitude of mediums and forms of expression, there are a plurality of “edge” states that inspire the artists who harbor them. For this reason, we leave the term completely open to our community’s interpretation, knowing from research and experience that this state could be driven by psychosis or trauma, or an altered state induced by drugs. It could be the offshoot of extreme depression or grief, or the aftermath of a spiritual or mystical state of consciousness.

Ultimately, we are interested in the artist’s individual experience and in his or her sense of what it is that drove the creative act. 

submissions@artfromtheedge.net

artfromtheedge.net

Filed under art Art Artists on Tumblr creative creativity artist artists state mental health Neuroscience science Science psychiatric psychiatry psychoanalysis psychological psychology psychotherapy psychosis trauma traumatic drug drugs support counsel counseling visual photography photo

44 notes

artfromtheedge:

“Woman with Flowing Hair (Moods)”
By Matt Vaillette

Could you tell us a little about yourself?
I’m a bipolar artist. I create primarily for therapy, and it works quite well. You can find me at mebeingsocial.tumblr.com !!
Was your submission created about or in an extreme state? 
It was created to show the many volatile moods of bipolarity. This is how it feels not being able to rely on yourself, or your mental state. It also looks like a psychotic state to me. Any sort of negative/shocking mental state really.



Click here to submit your own artwork to Art from the Edge

artfromtheedge:

“Woman with Flowing Hair (Moods)”

By Matt Vaillette



Could you tell us a little about yourself?

I’m a bipolar artist. I create primarily for therapy, and it works quite well. You can find me at mebeingsocial.tumblr.com !!

Was your submission created about or in an extreme state? 

It was created to show the many volatile moods of bipolarity. This is how it feels not being able to rely on yourself, or your mental state. It also looks like a psychotic state to me. Any sort of negative/shocking mental state really.

Filed under Questions bipolar bipolarity art artiscreative creativity emotions evolution Extreme resilience rethinking madness theory theories unconscious intelligence psychology psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychopathology psychotherapy visual therapy affective antipsychotic science serious mental illness Survivor strength Diagnostic