Serious Mental Illness Blog

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Posts tagged bipolar

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Suicide Prevention for All: Making the World a Safer Place to Be HumanBy Leah Harris, Mad in America
Is it melancholy to think that a world that Robin Williams can’t live in must be broken? To tie this sad event to the overarching misery of our times?
– Russell Brand, comedian/actor
Like millions, I am sitting with the fact that one of the funniest people to grace the planet has died by his own hand. Robin Williams’ death has hit people of my generation, Generation X, especially hard. After all, his face flashed often across our childhood screens. Mork and Mindy episodes were a source of solace for me as a little girl, as I bounced around between foster homes and family members’ homes, while my single mother cycled in and out of the state mental hospital, fighting to survive. I could laugh and say “nanu, nanu – shazbot” and “KO” and do the silly hand sign and forget for just a little while about living a life I didn’t ask for.
“You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it,” may become one of Robin Williams’ most famous quotes. I was always struck by how he moved so seamlessly between wacky comedy and the most intense dramas. He was so magnificently able to capture the human experience in all its extremes. He threw all that intensity right into our faces, undeniable, raw, frenetic. He showed us our own naked vulnerability and sparks of madness and gave us permission to laugh in the face of all that is wrong in this world.
In the wake of his death, many people are understandably jumping to identify causes. Depending on who you talk to, Robin Williams’ suicide was caused by depression, it was caused by bipolar disorder, it was caused by the drugs, prescription or otherwise. We just don’t know.
As a suicide attempt survivor myself, I can attest that it’s not that easy to find any single cause for the urge to die. It’s true that along with street drugs, SSRI antidepressants and other psych drugs can certainly increase suicide risk in some people. A decade ago, I was one of many who fought and won to get to the FDA to put a black box warning on SSRIs to warn the public of these very real risks. While a drug, legal or illegal, may give us the impetus we wouldn’t otherwise have had to act on suicidal thoughts, for some of us it’s more complex than that.
Our reasons for wanting to die are as varied as our reasons for wanting to live. That, I believe, is the great mystery of suicide.
But I invite us all not to fear the mystery; not to be struck hopeless by it. We can save each other’s lives; better yet, we can find and share reasons to keep on living. If we have 20 seconds, we can share information about a hotline or a warmline. But if we want to really see this horrific epidemic end, we all have to get more involved.
As someone who has looked into the void and longed for it more than once, I can attest that anyone who reaches out in those darkest of times is truly remarkable. It is, tragically, when I am most distressed and most in need of love and acceptance, that I have the hardest time reaching out. This is not an absolution of personal responsibility, because we all must accept some measure of that; rather a recognition that we shouldn’t put the full onus on a suicidal person to “reach out” and “ask for help.” We need to reach out and help. I have written about the problems with the master narrative of suicide prevention, and how punitive and dehumanizing much of the “help” out there currently is. This blog isn’t about that. I’m talking about help that heals.
My point is that we must change the way we relate to ourselves and one another. In revolutionary ways. We must wake up to the fact that we have been socialized since birth to hide the fullness of who we really are. Robin Williams got to act it all out and the world loved him for it. He expressed the madness, the wildness, that we have been conditioned to hide. We are generally chastised for laughing too hard or crying too loud or being too sensitive. We have been trained to put on a proper face and act like all is well. If for some reason we can’t naturally do that (and most of us can’t), we devise ways to cope with the awful unbearableness of it all. They may be fairly innocuous, like binge watching Orange is the New Black in bed all weekend long. Or we may seek to stop the pain in innumerable ways that we know will kill us in the end — from binge eating to chain smoking to staring down a bottle of whiskey or pills.
If we only realized just how many people walked around carrying heavy burdens that are invisible to the world, and were doing every fucking thing possible to keep from cracking under the weight, we would stop feeling so alone and isolated carrying our own. We could put down our burdens and rest, in the all-encompassing field of our human vulnerability and strength.
“Be kind, for everyone you know is fighting a hard battle,” said theologian Ian MacLaren. I am struck by the imperative need for us all to take up the challenge to be kinder to ourselves and others. There is so much suffering in the world. How often do we ask ourselves, in the midst of responding to Facebook posts, Tweets, and emails: how can I relieve suffering? At the very least, how do I not add to it?
No one person can fix this mess we have gotten ourselves into as a species, but we can each be a part of bringing more compassion and acceptance into the world. First, we have to learn to practice it with ourselves. We can be the antidote to the fear and sorrow that exists within us, in other people, and in the world “out there.” Kindness is dismissed as bullshit in a world that values power over others. But as mindfulness teacher Sharon Salzberg reminds us, kindness is a “force.” If unleashed in vast quantities, it could literally reverse the cycle of misery on this planet.
When will we stop walking around in these miraculous, vulnerable human bodies seeing ourselves as separate? What will it take for us to realize our interconnectedness; to act from a deep understanding that suicidal people are not to be feared and judged, but to be embraced and held in the light of understanding and true empathy? Empathy sees that we are all connected, and thus demands well-being for all.
I think of the people who report walking to the bridge and said to themselves, “if one person smiles at me or talks to me, I won’t jump.” Lately I try to go out of my way to smile at people, to talk to people, even if they look at me funny because they aren’t used to random strangers smiling at them or talking to them. Come to think of it, I think talking to strangers is definitely a symptom of some severe mental disorder in the DSM-V.
But seriously, folks. It strikes me that breaking down our collective walls of isolation, of chiseling away our carefully constructed masks, of taking care of ourselves and each other, of judging less and loving more, may be among the most important things we can do with our lives. We can simply value people, not for what they do or what they achieve in the world, but because they are alive on this planet with us, right now, sharing these troubled, turbulent and painfully beautiful times.
In the end, we are stunningly diverse, yet there are basic human needs that we all have in common. The ancient practice of lovingkindness exhorts us to wish for ourselves and all beings to be safe, to be healthy, to be free, to live with ease. How can we create a world where these universal human needs are met? I think this is one of the primary questions we should all be asking ourselves right now, and figuring out the answers together.
I don’t claim that smiling at the person who makes your coffee or talking to a stranger on the metro will save the planet. What I do believe is that if we all made human connection, safety, and a sense of shared belonging among our top priorities, if we all tried in ways large and small to end our collective isolation and suffering, this world would be a safer place to be human. And a lot of people might not be eager to leave so soon.
Nanu, nanu, Robin Williams. Rest in peace.
For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.Click Here to access original SMI Blog content

Suicide Prevention for All: Making the World a Safer Place to Be Human
By Leah Harris, Mad in America

Is it melancholy to think that a world that Robin Williams can’t live in must be broken? To tie this sad event to the overarching misery of our times?

– Russell Brand, comedian/actor

Like millions, I am sitting with the fact that one of the funniest people to grace the planet has died by his own hand. Robin Williams’ death has hit people of my generation, Generation X, especially hard. After all, his face flashed often across our childhood screens. Mork and Mindy episodes were a source of solace for me as a little girl, as I bounced around between foster homes and family members’ homes, while my single mother cycled in and out of the state mental hospital, fighting to survive. I could laugh and say “nanu, nanu – shazbot” and “KO” and do the silly hand sign and forget for just a little while about living a life I didn’t ask for.

“You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it,” may become one of Robin Williams’ most famous quotes. I was always struck by how he moved so seamlessly between wacky comedy and the most intense dramas. He was so magnificently able to capture the human experience in all its extremes. He threw all that intensity right into our faces, undeniable, raw, frenetic. He showed us our own naked vulnerability and sparks of madness and gave us permission to laugh in the face of all that is wrong in this world.

In the wake of his death, many people are understandably jumping to identify causes. Depending on who you talk to, Robin Williams’ suicide was caused by depression, it was caused by bipolar disorder, it was caused by the drugs, prescription or otherwise. We just don’t know.

As a suicide attempt survivor myself, I can attest that it’s not that easy to find any single cause for the urge to die. It’s true that along with street drugs, SSRI antidepressants and other psych drugs can certainly increase suicide risk in some people. A decade ago, I was one of many who fought and won to get to the FDA to put a black box warning on SSRIs to warn the public of these very real risks. While a drug, legal or illegal, may give us the impetus we wouldn’t otherwise have had to act on suicidal thoughts, for some of us it’s more complex than that.

Our reasons for wanting to die are as varied as our reasons for wanting to live. That, I believe, is the great mystery of suicide.

But I invite us all not to fear the mystery; not to be struck hopeless by it. We can save each other’s lives; better yet, we can find and share reasons to keep on living. If we have 20 seconds, we can share information about a hotline or a warmline. But if we want to really see this horrific epidemic end, we all have to get more involved.

As someone who has looked into the void and longed for it more than once, I can attest that anyone who reaches out in those darkest of times is truly remarkable. It is, tragically, when I am most distressed and most in need of love and acceptance, that I have the hardest time reaching out. This is not an absolution of personal responsibility, because we all must accept some measure of that; rather a recognition that we shouldn’t put the full onus on a suicidal person to “reach out” and “ask for help.” We need to reach out and help. I have written about the problems with the master narrative of suicide prevention, and how punitive and dehumanizing much of the “help” out there currently is. This blog isn’t about that. I’m talking about help that heals.

My point is that we must change the way we relate to ourselves and one another. In revolutionary ways. We must wake up to the fact that we have been socialized since birth to hide the fullness of who we really are. Robin Williams got to act it all out and the world loved him for it. He expressed the madness, the wildness, that we have been conditioned to hide. We are generally chastised for laughing too hard or crying too loud or being too sensitive. We have been trained to put on a proper face and act like all is well. If for some reason we can’t naturally do that (and most of us can’t), we devise ways to cope with the awful unbearableness of it all. They may be fairly innocuous, like binge watching Orange is the New Black in bed all weekend long. Or we may seek to stop the pain in innumerable ways that we know will kill us in the end — from binge eating to chain smoking to staring down a bottle of whiskey or pills.

If we only realized just how many people walked around carrying heavy burdens that are invisible to the world, and were doing every fucking thing possible to keep from cracking under the weight, we would stop feeling so alone and isolated carrying our own. We could put down our burdens and rest, in the all-encompassing field of our human vulnerability and strength.

“Be kind, for everyone you know is fighting a hard battle,” said theologian Ian MacLaren. I am struck by the imperative need for us all to take up the challenge to be kinder to ourselves and others. There is so much suffering in the world. How often do we ask ourselves, in the midst of responding to Facebook posts, Tweets, and emails: how can I relieve suffering? At the very least, how do I not add to it?

No one person can fix this mess we have gotten ourselves into as a species, but we can each be a part of bringing more compassion and acceptance into the world. First, we have to learn to practice it with ourselves. We can be the antidote to the fear and sorrow that exists within us, in other people, and in the world “out there.” Kindness is dismissed as bullshit in a world that values power over others. But as mindfulness teacher Sharon Salzberg reminds us, kindness is a “force.” If unleashed in vast quantities, it could literally reverse the cycle of misery on this planet.

When will we stop walking around in these miraculous, vulnerable human bodies seeing ourselves as separate? What will it take for us to realize our interconnectedness; to act from a deep understanding that suicidal people are not to be feared and judged, but to be embraced and held in the light of understanding and true empathy? Empathy sees that we are all connected, and thus demands well-being for all.

I think of the people who report walking to the bridge and said to themselves, “if one person smiles at me or talks to me, I won’t jump.” Lately I try to go out of my way to smile at people, to talk to people, even if they look at me funny because they aren’t used to random strangers smiling at them or talking to them. Come to think of it, I think talking to strangers is definitely a symptom of some severe mental disorder in the DSM-V.

But seriously, folks. It strikes me that breaking down our collective walls of isolation, of chiseling away our carefully constructed masks, of taking care of ourselves and each other, of judging less and loving more, may be among the most important things we can do with our lives. We can simply value people, not for what they do or what they achieve in the world, but because they are alive on this planet with us, right now, sharing these troubled, turbulent and painfully beautiful times.

In the end, we are stunningly diverse, yet there are basic human needs that we all have in common. The ancient practice of lovingkindness exhorts us to wish for ourselves and all beings to be safe, to be healthy, to be free, to live with ease. How can we create a world where these universal human needs are met? I think this is one of the primary questions we should all be asking ourselves right now, and figuring out the answers together.

I don’t claim that smiling at the person who makes your coffee or talking to a stranger on the metro will save the planet. What I do believe is that if we all made human connection, safety, and a sense of shared belonging among our top priorities, if we all tried in ways large and small to end our collective isolation and suffering, this world would be a safer place to be human. And a lot of people might not be eager to leave so soon.

Nanu, nanu, Robin Williams. Rest in peace.

For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.
Click Here
 to access original SMI Blog content

Filed under robin williams robin williams comedy mind body brain healthy health mental health mental illness drama depression depressed suicide suicidal bipolar bipolar disorder creativity hope recovery psychology psychiatry counseling death dead passing depressing comedian

80 notes

Being bipolar is hard but I know I can survive, says Derby womanBy W. Roberts , Derby Telegraph
For seven years, mental illness has been a major part of Elizabeth’s life – but she bravely battles on. She shares her story.
Manic moods controlled Elizabeth’s life until she picked up the phone and asked for help.
She had suicidal thoughts and tried to kill herself. She went to see her doctor.
“I knew I was ill,” said the 50-year-old from Derby. “How I was feeling was not right.
“There’s nothing normal about staying awake all night chatting on the phone to a friend and at the same time, manically cleaning your house from top to bottom.
“There is nothing normal about feeling so low and depressed that you can’t even find the energy to change out of your nightwear and keep it on all day.”
For years, Elizabeth coped the best way she could. She endured several stays in hospital and took a concoction of drugs to try to stabilise her moods.
Then she was diagnosed as being bipolar – a serious medical condition that causes shifts in moods, energy and ability to function. Since then, life has been a whole lot better.
“I suppose once I was told that I had bipolar, I began to realise why I had been feeling the way I had. In 2011, I was in hospital for 11 weeks and that was a long time but, in that period, the doctors worked hard to work out what was wrong and now I know what I’ve got, I can deal with it.
‘‘I am learning to live with it. I am finding room in my life for this condition.”
Elizabeth does not want to be identified. She says the stigma attached to mental health is too big and she is afraid to be labelled.
While she battles to lead a normal life, she says she does not want to be discriminated against. And in her community, like many others, it is simply never discussed.
But at the same time, she wants to speak out about mental illness and highlight how hard it.
“People don’t talk about mental illness,” she said.
“It is something people hide away and keep close to them. I don’t feel ready to tell everyone that I am bipolar.
“Life is hard enough for me. But day by day, I get more strength and I know, with the right medication, I can survive this.”
Elizabeth was only diagnosed with bipolar two years ago. Her mental illness first started to show itself in 2007.
But, before then, life was normal for the mum-of-one.
“I had a job, a house and a husband,” said Elizabeth.
“I worked in the caring industry and everything was fine. My daughter was all grown up and had her own place and I thought I had been a good mum.
“Looking back, I think things started to spiral out of control when my marriage failed. It was 2005. I literally lost the house and was made bankrupt.
“I started feeling paranoid and my mood dropped. I struggled to sleep because of the paranoia. I was worried about my future and what was going to happen. I think this was the start of it.
“I stopped sleeping and eating. I was worried about my life and that’s when the depression kicked in.”
Elizabeth went to see her GP and was put in touch with the team at Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. She was assigned a lead nurse. It was life-saving, says Elizabeth.
“To be honest, my nurse has been fantastic,” said Elizabeth.
“When I’ve felt like I’m losing it, I have picked up the phone and called her.
“I have always been able to recognise the signs of my illness and I think that has actually saved my life.
“Instead of suffering in silence, I have asked for help.
“Instead of getting more and more unwell, I have moved quickly to get the right kind of support.”
Elizabeth is not proud to have spent time in Derby’s Radbourne Unit – a service dealing with mental health, learning disability or substance misuse.
She has been detained under the Mental Health Act. “People don’t know what it is like to have a mental health problem,” said Elizabeth.
“It can be tough.
“Most of the time, my moods are low. But I have experienced severe highs and that can be dangerous too.
“Once I went out shopping and spent far too much money. I severely overspent and got into debt.”
Despite feeling stable at the moment, Elizabeth still describes herself as ‘vulnerable’.
She takes medication and the tablets are keeping her well, but she does worry about her future. “People do take advantage of me,” she said.
“I was in a relationship and we got engaged. Then he started asking me for money and I gave it to him. Before I knew it, I had given him quite a lot. He said the money was for our future. In the end, that wasn’t the case at all. The relationship ended.
“I am vulnerable. I know I am. And when things like this happen, my moods can dip.”
Elizabeth lives on her own. She admits she struggles to get motivated but says she would like to get back into employment.
She says she needs a purpose in life. Getting up and getting out, she says, could help her. Volunteering is something Elizabeth is interested in.
“My daughter is a good support to me,” said Elizabeth. “And my mum, who is elderly now, talks to me on the phone. We ring each other every day.
“But I suppose it’s my daughter who keeps her eye on me. She comes over for a meal and that makes me get up and cook something nice.
“She’s the one who says ‘tidy up the house, mum’. I don’t like to think that she worries about me, but I guess she does. I worry about myself sometimes.”
THE DISORDER CAN BE A SEVERELY DISABLING CONDITION’
BIPOLAR disorder is a condition in which a person has periods of depression and periods of being extremely happy, cross or irritable.
It is also known as manic depressive illness. It is a serious medical condition and can leave sufferers unable to function.
Bipolar disorder is relatively common. It affects about one person in every 100.
It can occur at any age, although it typically develops between the ages of 18 and 24. Men and women from all backgrounds are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.
The pattern of mood swings in bipolar disorder varies widely between people. Some people will only have a couple of bipolar episodes in their lifetime and will be stable in between, while others may experience many episodes.
The exact causes of bipolar disorder are not known. However, it is thought that several things can trigger an episode.
Extreme stress, overwhelming problems and life-changing events are often thought to contribute, as well as genetic and chemical factors.
The high and low phases of bipolar disorder are often so extreme that they interfere with everyday life.
Elizabeth’s lead nurse at Derbyshire Healthcare Foundation Trust, said: “Bipolar disorder can be a severely disabling medical condition. However, many individuals can live full and satisfying lives within their own homes with the use of regular doses of medication to stabilise their mood. Although bipolar disorder is usually a long-term condition, effective treatment combined with self-help techniques can limit its impact on everyday life. Staying active and maintaining a healthy diet are important. Exercise and taking up a new hobby can also help to reduce the symptoms, particularly depressive symptoms.
“To date there is no cure, but proper treatment helps most people with bipolar disorder gain better control of their mood swings and symptoms, because this is a lifelong and recurrent illness.
“People with the disorder need long-term treatment to maintain and control symptoms. An effective maintenance treatment plan includes medication and psychotherapy for preventing relapse and reducing symptoms.
“Not everyone responds to medication in the same way, therefore several different medications may need to be trialed before the preferred course of treatment is identified.
“Understanding the illness is key for the person with bipolar disorder, allowing them to gain insight into their condition and recognise relapse symptoms unique to them.
‘‘Should anyone feel they suffer with the above symptoms then your first port of contact should be your GP who will assess you and make a referral to mental health services if they feel this is necessary.”
For more information, visit www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Bipolar-disorder/Pages/Introduction.aspx
For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.Click Here to access original SMI Blog content

Being bipolar is hard but I know I can survive, says Derby woman
By W. Roberts , Derby Telegraph

For seven years, mental illness has been a major part of Elizabeth’s life – but she bravely battles on. She shares her story.

Manic moods controlled Elizabeth’s life until she picked up the phone and asked for help.

She had suicidal thoughts and tried to kill herself. She went to see her doctor.

“I knew I was ill,” said the 50-year-old from Derby. “How I was feeling was not right.

“There’s nothing normal about staying awake all night chatting on the phone to a friend and at the same time, manically cleaning your house from top to bottom.

“There is nothing normal about feeling so low and depressed that you can’t even find the energy to change out of your nightwear and keep it on all day.”

For years, Elizabeth coped the best way she could. She endured several stays in hospital and took a concoction of drugs to try to stabilise her moods.

Then she was diagnosed as being bipolar – a serious medical condition that causes shifts in moods, energy and ability to function. Since then, life has been a whole lot better.

“I suppose once I was told that I had bipolar, I began to realise why I had been feeling the way I had. In 2011, I was in hospital for 11 weeks and that was a long time but, in that period, the doctors worked hard to work out what was wrong and now I know what I’ve got, I can deal with it.

‘‘I am learning to live with it. I am finding room in my life for this condition.”

Elizabeth does not want to be identified. She says the stigma attached to mental health is too big and she is afraid to be labelled.

While she battles to lead a normal life, she says she does not want to be discriminated against. And in her community, like many others, it is simply never discussed.

But at the same time, she wants to speak out about mental illness and highlight how hard it.

“People don’t talk about mental illness,” she said.

“It is something people hide away and keep close to them. I don’t feel ready to tell everyone that I am bipolar.

“Life is hard enough for me. But day by day, I get more strength and I know, with the right medication, I can survive this.”

Elizabeth was only diagnosed with bipolar two years ago. Her mental illness first started to show itself in 2007.

But, before then, life was normal for the mum-of-one.

“I had a job, a house and a husband,” said Elizabeth.

“I worked in the caring industry and everything was fine. My daughter was all grown up and had her own place and I thought I had been a good mum.

“Looking back, I think things started to spiral out of control when my marriage failed. It was 2005. I literally lost the house and was made bankrupt.

“I started feeling paranoid and my mood dropped. I struggled to sleep because of the paranoia. I was worried about my future and what was going to happen. I think this was the start of it.

“I stopped sleeping and eating. I was worried about my life and that’s when the depression kicked in.”

Elizabeth went to see her GP and was put in touch with the team at Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. She was assigned a lead nurse. It was life-saving, says Elizabeth.

“To be honest, my nurse has been fantastic,” said Elizabeth.

“When I’ve felt like I’m losing it, I have picked up the phone and called her.

“I have always been able to recognise the signs of my illness and I think that has actually saved my life.

“Instead of suffering in silence, I have asked for help.

“Instead of getting more and more unwell, I have moved quickly to get the right kind of support.”

Elizabeth is not proud to have spent time in Derby’s Radbourne Unit – a service dealing with mental health, learning disability or substance misuse.

She has been detained under the Mental Health Act. “People don’t know what it is like to have a mental health problem,” said Elizabeth.

“It can be tough.

“Most of the time, my moods are low. But I have experienced severe highs and that can be dangerous too.

“Once I went out shopping and spent far too much money. I severely overspent and got into debt.”

Despite feeling stable at the moment, Elizabeth still describes herself as ‘vulnerable’.

She takes medication and the tablets are keeping her well, but she does worry about her future. “People do take advantage of me,” she said.

“I was in a relationship and we got engaged. Then he started asking me for money and I gave it to him. Before I knew it, I had given him quite a lot. He said the money was for our future. In the end, that wasn’t the case at all. The relationship ended.

“I am vulnerable. I know I am. And when things like this happen, my moods can dip.”

Elizabeth lives on her own. She admits she struggles to get motivated but says she would like to get back into employment.

She says she needs a purpose in life. Getting up and getting out, she says, could help her. Volunteering is something Elizabeth is interested in.

“My daughter is a good support to me,” said Elizabeth. “And my mum, who is elderly now, talks to me on the phone. We ring each other every day.

“But I suppose it’s my daughter who keeps her eye on me. She comes over for a meal and that makes me get up and cook something nice.

“She’s the one who says ‘tidy up the house, mum’. I don’t like to think that she worries about me, but I guess she does. I worry about myself sometimes.”

THE DISORDER CAN BE A SEVERELY DISABLING CONDITION’

BIPOLAR disorder is a condition in which a person has periods of depression and periods of being extremely happy, cross or irritable.

It is also known as manic depressive illness. It is a serious medical condition and can leave sufferers unable to function.

Bipolar disorder is relatively common. It affects about one person in every 100.

It can occur at any age, although it typically develops between the ages of 18 and 24. Men and women from all backgrounds are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.

The pattern of mood swings in bipolar disorder varies widely between people. Some people will only have a couple of bipolar episodes in their lifetime and will be stable in between, while others may experience many episodes.

The exact causes of bipolar disorder are not known. However, it is thought that several things can trigger an episode.

Extreme stress, overwhelming problems and life-changing events are often thought to contribute, as well as genetic and chemical factors.

The high and low phases of bipolar disorder are often so extreme that they interfere with everyday life.

Elizabeth’s lead nurse at Derbyshire Healthcare Foundation Trust, said: “Bipolar disorder can be a severely disabling medical condition. However, many individuals can live full and satisfying lives within their own homes with the use of regular doses of medication to stabilise their mood. Although bipolar disorder is usually a long-term condition, effective treatment combined with self-help techniques can limit its impact on everyday life. Staying active and maintaining a healthy diet are important. Exercise and taking up a new hobby can also help to reduce the symptoms, particularly depressive symptoms.

“To date there is no cure, but proper treatment helps most people with bipolar disorder gain better control of their mood swings and symptoms, because this is a lifelong and recurrent illness.

“People with the disorder need long-term treatment to maintain and control symptoms. An effective maintenance treatment plan includes medication and psychotherapy for preventing relapse and reducing symptoms.

“Not everyone responds to medication in the same way, therefore several different medications may need to be trialed before the preferred course of treatment is identified.

“Understanding the illness is key for the person with bipolar disorder, allowing them to gain insight into their condition and recognise relapse symptoms unique to them.

‘‘Should anyone feel they suffer with the above symptoms then your first port of contact should be your GP who will assess you and make a referral to mental health services if they feel this is necessary.”

For more information, visit www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Bipolar-disorder/Pages/Introduction.aspx

For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.
Click Here
 to access original SMI Blog content

Filed under bipolar manic depressed depression major depression sad sadness hope recovery heal healing recover treatment mind body brain wellness healthy mental health mental health mental illness illness diagnosis disorder mad madness psychology psychiatry counseling

61 notes

20 years on: Finally our myopic brain obsession is on the waneBy John Read, Discursive of Tunbridge Wells
Professor John Read, back in the UK after a long period away, is struck by some important changes in the way we view mental health problems
It’s good to be back in the UK after twenty years in New Zealand – well, apart from the weather, the political, economic and spiritual state of England, and the endless phone calls to India to get someone from up the road to install a phone. Amid it all I’m writing my first ever blog! What an antiquated old prof.
As regards mental health research, the difference I notice most is how far people’s thinking has moved on from the old, simplistic, ‘blame-the-brain-for- everything-and-medicate’ idea. 
Two papers I’ve published since returning will both, I hope, contribute to this on-going development. The first was published with colleagues from Scandinavia and the USA in the journal Neuropsychiatry With the snappy title ‘The Traumagenic Neurodevelopmental Model of Psychosis Revisited’it reports on 125 papers that support a model we first put forward in 2001 outlining how psychosis can be related to trauma. This model is a challenge to those I call ‘contextless brain researchers’: people who when they find a difference in the brains of two groups of people, assume that they have found the cause of the difference. It rarely seems to occur to them to ask a vital (and some might say obvious) question: ‘what might have happened to make the groups different?’ I would not for a moment dispute that such researchers are well-intentioned folk. They may have a deep knowledge of neurology and access to some very fancy technology. However, they often don’t seem to grasp the simple fact that a primary function of the brain is to respond to the environment.
One of the findings underpinning our model is that there are some striking similarities between the brains of traumatised young children and those of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Perhaps the most important is in the way that the nervous systems (the ‘HPA axis’, to be precise) of the two groups respond to stress. We’ve been told for decades that the reason that people who experience ‘psychosis’ are sensitive to stress is genetic. It now seems that for many people the cause of such heightened sensitivity may lie elsewhere: in early trauma.
This goes to the heart of whether the much touted ‘bio-psycho-social model’ and its alter ego the ‘stress-vulnerability model’ really do what it says on the tin, and offer a genuine integration of nature and nurture. I argue in my book Models of Madness that these terms can sometimes disguise what is still fundamentally a biological explanation of our experiences. We’re told that stress can play a role, but only in people who already have a supposed genetic predisposition. Life events, even serious and traumatic ones, are relegated to the role of ‘triggers’ of an underlying genetic time bomb. Bio-genetics enthusiasts claim that the ‘vulnerability’ part of the equation must be genetic. This conveniently ignores the fact that the inventors of the model, Joseph Zubin and Bonnie Spring, stated in their seminal 1977 paper that the vulnerability can be acquired from early life events. As Michael Caine used to say, ‘Not a lot of people know that’.
This all reminds me that a few years back Robin Murray, Professor of Research at London’s Institute of Psychiatry, announced from a Canadian conference stage that ‘The schizophrenia wars ended in the 1970s’. I couldn’t help raising my hand and pointing out that the occupying force in a colonial war is usually quick to announce the end of hostilities, and that the war would not be over until the occupying forces withdrew to the appropriate boundary.
It is remarkable then that the relationship between trauma and psychosis – heresy just 15 years ago - is now one of the strongest and most consistent findings in our field. How times have changed – and how quickly. I now hear people saying ‘What’s all the fuss about? We always knew that - nothing controversial there’. Some of the most scathing critics of our first few papers are now happily putting their names on papers confirming the relationship. I was moaning about the ‘hypocrisy’ of all this to my colleague Richard Bentall recently and he replied ‘John, John, - you’ve won and you’re still bitching!’
The ‘victory’ had never felt so real as when I heard some wonderful news from New Zealand towards the end of last year. An abuse survivor had twice been denied financial aid in relation to subsequent mental health problems because two ‘experts’ - employed by the agency responsible for making such payments - had stated that there is no evidence that child abuse can cause psychosis. However, in the final appeal a psychiatrist summarised the substantial literature which attests otherwise. The judge upheld the appeal and I’ll admit I took some naughty pleasure in the NZ’s national Sunday newspaper quoting me as saying that the first two psychiatrists, ‘either knew nothing about the many studies documenting the relationship between child abuse and psychosis or were trying to mislead the judge’.
Another area where research is challenging the simplistic medical model type thinking in mental health is that of interventions. More and more studies are giving the lie to the pharmaceutical company propaganda which would have us believe that their products are targeted, specific ‘treatments’ for identified brain problems. My second recent paper reported an online survey of 1,829 people taking antidepressants. It revealed some astonishing levels of psychological and interpersonal adverse effects. For example, 60% of people reported feeling emotionally numb, 42% said that the drugs reduced positive as well as negative emotions, and 39% felt that they cared less about others whilst on the drug. Other effects are already well documented but we were surprised at their sheer frequency: 62% reported sexual difficulties (rising to 72% for men), and 39% reported feeling suicidal, rising to 55% in 18-25 year olds. Withdrawal effects, often dismissed as rare or imagined – were reported by 55%. Those who had been more depressed when the drugs were first prescribed were no more likely than others to experience these effects, suggesting that they were drug-related rather than symptoms of the depression itself.
Although biologically-rooted explanations of distress and pharmaceutical treatments are still prevalent, it seems that both professionals and the public are increasingly exploring alternatives. All over the world – with the sole exception of the USA – surveys reveal that the public, including service users and carers, tends to take the common-sense view that mental health problems are related much more closely to the events and circumstances of our lives than to biological factors such as genetics or brain chemicals. When it comes to help the public also strongly prefer psychological and social approaches over drugs, electroshock therapy or hospitals. Only a minority of professionals seem intent on continuing to ignore experience and push the idea that mental health problems are essentially problems with our brains. And those people are getting older by the minute. Things have changed unbelievably in 20 years. Hopefully, if we all keep pushing, in whatever way our circumstances allow, our mental health services will finally become evidence-based, effective and humane. 
John Read is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Director of the Clinical Psychology Programme at Liverpool University. You can follow him on Twitter @ReadReadj
For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.Click Here to access original SMI Blog content

20 years on: Finally our myopic brain obsession is on the wane
By John Read, Discursive of Tunbridge Wells

Professor John Read, back in the UK after a long period away, is struck by some important changes in the way we view mental health problems

It’s good to be back in the UK after twenty years in New Zealand – well, apart from the weather, the political, economic and spiritual state of England, and the endless phone calls to India to get someone from up the road to install a phone. Amid it all I’m writing my first ever blog! What an antiquated old prof.

As regards mental health research, the difference I notice most is how far people’s thinking has moved on from the old, simplistic, ‘blame-the-brain-for- everything-and-medicate’ idea. 

Two papers I’ve published since returning will both, I hope, contribute to this on-going development. The first was published with colleagues from Scandinavia and the USA in the journal Neuropsychiatry With the snappy title ‘The Traumagenic Neurodevelopmental Model of Psychosis Revisited’it reports on 125 papers that support a model we first put forward in 2001 outlining how psychosis can be related to trauma. This model is a challenge to those I call ‘contextless brain researchers’: people who when they find a difference in the brains of two groups of people, assume that they have found the cause of the difference. It rarely seems to occur to them to ask a vital (and some might say obvious) question: ‘what might have happened to make the groups different?’ I would not for a moment dispute that such researchers are well-intentioned folk. They may have a deep knowledge of neurology and access to some very fancy technology. However, they often don’t seem to grasp the simple fact that a primary function of the brain is to respond to the environment.

One of the findings underpinning our model is that there are some striking similarities between the brains of traumatised young children and those of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Perhaps the most important is in the way that the nervous systems (the ‘HPA axis’, to be precise) of the two groups respond to stress. We’ve been told for decades that the reason that people who experience ‘psychosis’ are sensitive to stress is genetic. It now seems that for many people the cause of such heightened sensitivity may lie elsewhere: in early trauma.

This goes to the heart of whether the much touted ‘bio-psycho-social model’ and its alter ego the ‘stress-vulnerability model’ really do what it says on the tin, and offer a genuine integration of nature and nurture. I argue in my book Models of Madness that these terms can sometimes disguise what is still fundamentally a biological explanation of our experiences. We’re told that stress can play a role, but only in people who already have a supposed genetic predisposition. Life events, even serious and traumatic ones, are relegated to the role of ‘triggers’ of an underlying genetic time bomb. Bio-genetics enthusiasts claim that the ‘vulnerability’ part of the equation must be genetic. This conveniently ignores the fact that the inventors of the model, Joseph Zubin and Bonnie Spring, stated in their seminal 1977 paper that the vulnerability can be acquired from early life events. As Michael Caine used to say, ‘Not a lot of people know that’.

This all reminds me that a few years back Robin Murray, Professor of Research at London’s Institute of Psychiatry, announced from a Canadian conference stage that ‘The schizophrenia wars ended in the 1970s’. I couldn’t help raising my hand and pointing out that the occupying force in a colonial war is usually quick to announce the end of hostilities, and that the war would not be over until the occupying forces withdrew to the appropriate boundary.

It is remarkable then that the relationship between trauma and psychosis – heresy just 15 years ago - is now one of the strongest and most consistent findings in our field. How times have changed – and how quickly. I now hear people saying ‘What’s all the fuss about? We always knew that - nothing controversial there’. Some of the most scathing critics of our first few papers are now happily putting their names on papers confirming the relationship. I was moaning about the ‘hypocrisy’ of all this to my colleague Richard Bentall recently and he replied ‘John, John, - you’ve won and you’re still bitching!’

The ‘victory’ had never felt so real as when I heard some wonderful news from New Zealand towards the end of last year. An abuse survivor had twice been denied financial aid in relation to subsequent mental health problems because two ‘experts’ - employed by the agency responsible for making such payments - had stated that there is no evidence that child abuse can cause psychosis. However, in the final appeal a psychiatrist summarised the substantial literature which attests otherwise. The judge upheld the appeal and I’ll admit I took some naughty pleasure in the NZ’s national Sunday newspaper quoting me as saying that the first two psychiatrists, ‘either knew nothing about the many studies documenting the relationship between child abuse and psychosis or were trying to mislead the judge’.

Another area where research is challenging the simplistic medical model type thinking in mental health is that of interventions. More and more studies are giving the lie to the pharmaceutical company propaganda which would have us believe that their products are targeted, specific ‘treatments’ for identified brain problems. My second recent paper reported an online survey of 1,829 people taking antidepressants. It revealed some astonishing levels of psychological and interpersonal adverse effects. For example, 60% of people reported feeling emotionally numb, 42% said that the drugs reduced positive as well as negative emotions, and 39% felt that they cared less about others whilst on the drug. Other effects are already well documented but we were surprised at their sheer frequency: 62% reported sexual difficulties (rising to 72% for men), and 39% reported feeling suicidal, rising to 55% in 18-25 year olds. Withdrawal effects, often dismissed as rare or imagined – were reported by 55%. Those who had been more depressed when the drugs were first prescribed were no more likely than others to experience these effects, suggesting that they were drug-related rather than symptoms of the depression itself.

Although biologically-rooted explanations of distress and pharmaceutical treatments are still prevalent, it seems that both professionals and the public are increasingly exploring alternatives. All over the world – with the sole exception of the USA – surveys reveal that the public, including service users and carers, tends to take the common-sense view that mental health problems are related much more closely to the events and circumstances of our lives than to biological factors such as genetics or brain chemicals. When it comes to help the public also strongly prefer psychological and social approaches over drugs, electroshock therapy or hospitals. Only a minority of professionals seem intent on continuing to ignore experience and push the idea that mental health problems are essentially problems with our brains. And those people are getting older by the minute. Things have changed unbelievably in 20 years. Hopefully, if we all keep pushing, in whatever way our circumstances allow, our mental health services will finally become evidence-based, effective and humane. 

John Read is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Director of the Clinical Psychology Programme at Liverpool University. You can follow him on Twitter @ReadReadj

For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.
Click Here
 to access original SMI Blog content

Filed under brain mind body mental mental health illness recovery hope treatment psychosis psychotic schizophrenia bipolar bipolar disorder hallucination hallucinations delusion delusions delusional diagnosis disorder psychology psychiatry counseling neuroscience science research mental illness health

18 notes

Bipolar Parenting and StigmaBy Rebecca Moore, PsychCentral
Once we have been diagnosed as having Bipolar Disorder, our first reaction is not to jump out and tell the entire world that we are suffering from a chronic, life long, debilitating, mental illness. For many of us, we hide our diagnosis and suffer in secret due to judgement and ridicule from many of our friends and family members. I wish the case wasn’t so, but society has left it’s mark and it is hard for us to come clean to the world around us about what is happening inside our bodies. 
Telling family members we have Bipolar Disorder is often difficult and embarrassing. We never know if we are going to receive their on-going support or if they are going to put us down and judge us as parents because of an illness we have no control over.
This was one of the main reasons I wrote the book Moorestorms A Guide For The Bipolar Parent I wanted parents to feel less alone in their struggles and I wanted to give them a source of comfort and encouragement to reach out to other people for support. When I wrote that book, it really was me be coming out for the first time and I did it in a very big way. I also needed my own family and friends to understand the struggles I faced on a daily basis and so the book was written and published. I put my daily struggles and life out there for the world to see in hopes of helping family and friends understand what it is like to be a Bipolar Parent.
Now I’m not suggesting you go out and write a book about having Bipolar Disorder. Just mentioning that you have the illness can be scary enough. But finding books like Moorestorms A Guide For The Bipolar Parent, and other self-help books can help your family members understand what you are going through if you are having a hard time explaining it yourself.
You may also consider taking your loved one to a doctors appointment or therapy appointment with you. The therapist or doctor may be able to explain your illness in a way that your loved one can understand.
I have always lived by the motto that those that scream the loudest get the most attention and if we are going to break down the wall of stigma that has surrounded us, the one that has been built by society to shame us, we have to make a lot of noise and get a lot of people’s attention when it comes to being a Bipolar Parent.
Until next time…. BeccaMy Personal Blog


 
 
For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.Click Here to access original SMI Blog content 

Bipolar Parenting and Stigma
By Rebecca Moore, PsychCentral

Once we have been diagnosed as having Bipolar Disorder, our first reaction is not to jump out and tell the entire world that we are suffering from a chronic, life long, debilitating, mental illness. For many of us, we hide our diagnosis and suffer in secret due to judgement and ridicule from many of our friends and family members. I wish the case wasn’t so, but society has left it’s mark and it is hard for us to come clean to the world around us about what is happening inside our bodies. 

Telling family members we have Bipolar Disorder is often difficult and embarrassing. We never know if we are going to receive their on-going support or if they are going to put us down and judge us as parents because of an illness we have no control over.

This was one of the main reasons I wrote the book Moorestorms A Guide For The Bipolar Parent I wanted parents to feel less alone in their struggles and I wanted to give them a source of comfort and encouragement to reach out to other people for support. When I wrote that book, it really was me be coming out for the first time and I did it in a very big way. I also needed my own family and friends to understand the struggles I faced on a daily basis and so the book was written and published. I put my daily struggles and life out there for the world to see in hopes of helping family and friends understand what it is like to be a Bipolar Parent.

Now I’m not suggesting you go out and write a book about having Bipolar Disorder. Just mentioning that you have the illness can be scary enough. But finding books like Moorestorms A Guide For The Bipolar Parent, and other self-help books can help your family members understand what you are going through if you are having a hard time explaining it yourself.

You may also consider taking your loved one to a doctors appointment or therapy appointment with you. The therapist or doctor may be able to explain your illness in a way that your loved one can understand.

I have always lived by the motto that those that scream the loudest get the most attention and if we are going to break down the wall of stigma that has surrounded us, the one that has been built by society to shame us, we have to make a lot of noise and get a lot of people’s attention when it comes to being a Bipolar Parent.

Until next time….
Becca
My Personal Blog

 

 





For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.
Click Here
 to access original SMI Blog content
 

Filed under bipolar bipolar disorder disorder diagnosis mental health mental illness mental health illness psychology psychiatry counseling parent child parenting kid children kids mind body brain wellness healthy emotions thoughts feelings mania manic depressed manic depression

140 notes

Strategies for Reducing Signs of Mania in Bipolar DisorderBy Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S., PsychCentral 
Effectively managing bipolar disorder includes knowing the early signs of an episode. It also means having a plan to address these signs before they escalate into hypomania, mania or depression.
According to authors Janelle M. Caponigro, MA, Eric H. Lee, MA, Sheri L. Johnson, Ph.D, and Ann M. Kring, Ph.D, in their book Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for the Newly Diagnosed, common warning signs of mania or hypomania include: feeling irritable, sleeping less, having more energy, driving faster, talking faster, starting new projects, feeling more self-confident, dressing differently, having increased sexual feelings and feeling impatient.
Every person has his or her own unique warning signs. For instance, you might notice that your day is filled to the brim with activities, and you stop taking breaks. You might start spending several hundred dollars on items you don’t need. And others might comment on how overly enthusiastic you are.
To figure out your warning signs, think back to your latest manic episode and what symptoms and experiences precipitated it. It’s also helpful to ask others for input and keep a daily mood chart.
When you’re noticing these warning signs (or you just don’t feel like yourself), the authors recommend contacting your treatment team.
They also elaborate on three types of strategies to employ when signs point to a hypomanic or manic episode: calming yourself; protecting against negative behaviors (such as overspending); and managing medications and therapy.
Here are suggestions from Bipolar Disorder for each type of strategy to help you manage warning signs and prevent a full-blown manic episode.
Calming Yourself
Get at least 10 hours of sleep per night. Interestingly, before today’s medications for bipolar disorder were developed, sleeping was one of the chief treatments for mania. “In fact, sleeping for a long time for three or four days in a row can be enough to restore mood and prevent relapse.” If you have a hard time falling asleep, rest in a quiet room (without any technology or other distractions).
Limit your activities and tasks. If you’re not able to scale back, focus only on the most important activities.
Don’t spend any more than six hours being active each day. Spend the rest of the time relaxing.
Don’t try to exhaust yourself. Trying to tire yourself out through exercise or other kinds of stimulating activities actually doesn’t quiet energy; it just increases it.
Avoid stimulating surroundings. This includes crowded parties, shopping malls and any other places you find energizing.
Avoid stimulating foods and beverages. Avoid coffee, soda, energy drinks and any vitamins or over-the-counter medication with caffeine.
Avoid drugs and alcohol. The authors suggest cutting out alcohol entirely when you’re noticing symptoms.
Engage in calming activities. This includes taking a walk, practicing yoga, breathing deeply and listening to relaxing music.
Create a list of go-to activities that help to slow you down. These are small actions, such as talking to a friend who calms you.
Protecting Against Negative Behaviors
Limit your spending. For instance, you might ask your credit card company to lower your limit or ask a loved one you trust to keep your credit cards for a certain time.
Postpone big decisions. Wait until you can review them with your treatment team or a trusted loved one. Also, give yourself a day to reflect on the pros and cons of a potential decision.
Avoid letting yourself feel high “a little longer.” Remember, the higher you go, the harder you’ll fall. Working to minimize early warning signs sooner helps you prevent symptoms from progressing into an episode.
Ask trusted loved ones to tell you if your behavior is out of the norm.
Avoid putting yourself in potentially triggering situations.These include new romances, unsafe sex and conflict.
Managing Medication and Therapy
When people with bipolar disorder are hypomanic or manic, they commonly think they don’t need their medication. However, instead of not taking your medication (this can be dangerous), consult your prescribing physician. They may change or increase your medication, which can help to stave off a manic episode.
If you’re working with a therapist, you might want to increase your appointments or move them to an earlier time or day.
Bipolar disorder is a serious illness, and it can be tough to pinpoint your warning signs and to manage them. But by thinking ahead, brainstorming with your treatment team and having a plan of strategies that work for you, you can get better and stay well.
Image source: Dogwalla

 
 
For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.Click Here to access original SMI Blog content 

Strategies for Reducing Signs of Mania in Bipolar Disorder
By Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S., PsychCentral 

Effectively managing bipolar disorder includes knowing the early signs of an episode. It also means having a plan to address these signs before they escalate into hypomania, mania or depression.

According to authors Janelle M. Caponigro, MA, Eric H. Lee, MA, Sheri L. Johnson, Ph.D, and Ann M. Kring, Ph.D, in their book Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for the Newly Diagnosed, common warning signs of mania or hypomania include: feeling irritable, sleeping less, having more energy, driving faster, talking faster, starting new projects, feeling more self-confident, dressing differently, having increased sexual feelings and feeling impatient.

Every person has his or her own unique warning signs. For instance, you might notice that your day is filled to the brim with activities, and you stop taking breaks. You might start spending several hundred dollars on items you don’t need. And others might comment on how overly enthusiastic you are.

To figure out your warning signs, think back to your latest manic episode and what symptoms and experiences precipitated it. It’s also helpful to ask others for input and keep a daily mood chart.

When you’re noticing these warning signs (or you just don’t feel like yourself), the authors recommend contacting your treatment team.

They also elaborate on three types of strategies to employ when signs point to a hypomanic or manic episode: calming yourself; protecting against negative behaviors (such as overspending); and managing medications and therapy.

Here are suggestions from Bipolar Disorder for each type of strategy to help you manage warning signs and prevent a full-blown manic episode.

Calming Yourself

  • Get at least 10 hours of sleep per night. Interestingly, before today’s medications for bipolar disorder were developed, sleeping was one of the chief treatments for mania. “In fact, sleeping for a long time for three or four days in a row can be enough to restore mood and prevent relapse.” If you have a hard time falling asleep, rest in a quiet room (without any technology or other distractions).
  • Limit your activities and tasks. If you’re not able to scale back, focus only on the most important activities.
  • Don’t spend any more than six hours being active each day. Spend the rest of the time relaxing.
  • Don’t try to exhaust yourself. Trying to tire yourself out through exercise or other kinds of stimulating activities actually doesn’t quiet energy; it just increases it.
  • Avoid stimulating surroundings. This includes crowded parties, shopping malls and any other places you find energizing.
  • Avoid stimulating foods and beverages. Avoid coffee, soda, energy drinks and any vitamins or over-the-counter medication with caffeine.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol. The authors suggest cutting out alcohol entirely when you’re noticing symptoms.
  • Engage in calming activities. This includes taking a walk, practicing yoga, breathing deeply and listening to relaxing music.
  • Create a list of go-to activities that help to slow you down. These are small actions, such as talking to a friend who calms you.

Protecting Against Negative Behaviors

  • Limit your spending. For instance, you might ask your credit card company to lower your limit or ask a loved one you trust to keep your credit cards for a certain time.
  • Postpone big decisions. Wait until you can review them with your treatment team or a trusted loved one. Also, give yourself a day to reflect on the pros and cons of a potential decision.
  • Avoid letting yourself feel high “a little longer.” Remember, the higher you go, the harder you’ll fall. Working to minimize early warning signs sooner helps you prevent symptoms from progressing into an episode.
  • Ask trusted loved ones to tell you if your behavior is out of the norm.
  • Avoid putting yourself in potentially triggering situations.These include new romances, unsafe sex and conflict.

Managing Medication and Therapy

When people with bipolar disorder are hypomanic or manic, they commonly think they don’t need their medication. However, instead of not taking your medication (this can be dangerous), consult your prescribing physician. They may change or increase your medication, which can help to stave off a manic episode.

If you’re working with a therapist, you might want to increase your appointments or move them to an earlier time or day.

Bipolar disorder is a serious illness, and it can be tough to pinpoint your warning signs and to manage them. But by thinking ahead, brainstorming with your treatment team and having a plan of strategies that work for you, you can get better and stay well.

Image source: Dogwalla

 

 





For more mental health resources, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog.
Click Here
 to access original SMI Blog content
 

Filed under bipolar mania depressed depression depressive sad sadness mental health mental illness mental health illness healthy mind body brain wellness recovery symptoms symptom disorder diagnosis psychology psychiatry counseling treatment Mania sleep energy hypomania