Serious Mental Illness Blog

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[Article of Interest] Adapting to the challenge of psychosis: personal resilience and the use of sealing-over (avoidant) coping strategies
By Lynda Tait, PhD; Max Birchwood, DSc; Peter Trower, PhD
Excerpt of the Article:  In contrast to earlier views of recovery style as a stable trait characteristic, recent evidence suggests that recovery style can change over time […] Recovery style has been identified as an important factor in adjustment to psychosis.
This [study] supports the view that a functional sense of self or identity is an important resilience factor in recovery from psychosis, and in facilitating coping efforts. 

[Article of Interest] Adapting to the challenge of psychosis: personal resilience and the use of sealing-over (avoidant) coping strategies

By Lynda Tait, PhD; Max Birchwood, DSc; Peter Trower, PhD

Excerpt of the Article:  In contrast to earlier views of recovery style as a stable trait characteristic, recent evidence suggests that recovery style can change over time […] Recovery style has been identified as an important factor in adjustment to psychosis.

This [study] supports the view that a functional sense of self or identity is an important resilience factor in recovery from psychosis, and in facilitating coping efforts

Filed under psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychotic psychotherapy psychopharmacology psychopathology SMI schizophrenia serious mental illness emotions resilience strength cope coping mental Mad madness mad pride knafo isps affective science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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[Article of Interest] “Families and First Break: An Evolving Role” – Ron Bassman, Karyn Baker & Connie Packard
ABSTRACT: The changing role of the family and how the family unit may help or harm a disturbed and/or disturbing member is examined. The authors use their personal experiences as mental health professionals, user/survivors and family members to inform their critique. A brief history of family involvement – how the family has been perceived and worked with by mental health professionals – is followed by a description of present day practices. The paper concludes with speculation about alternatives in which quality of life for all of the family members may be more possible.

[Article of Interest] “Families and First Break: An Evolving Role” – Ron Bassman, Karyn Baker & Connie Packard

ABSTRACT: The changing role of the family and how the family unit may help or harm a disturbed and/or disturbing member is examined. The authors use their personal experiences as mental health professionals, user/survivors and family members to inform their critique. A brief history of family involvement – how the family has been perceived and worked with by mental health professionals – is followed by a description of present day practices. The paper concludes with speculation about alternatives in which quality of life for all of the family members may be more possible.

Filed under psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychotic psychotherapy psychopharmacology Mad madness mad pride research rethinking madness ptsd personality disorder psychopathology knafo serious mental illness science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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"International Society for the Psychological Treatments of the Schizophrenias and Other Psychoses" soon to be called "International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis"

fuckyeahmadpride:

MEDIA RELEASE

March 2011

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY REMOVES ‘SCHIZOPHRENIA’ FROM ITS TITLE

 Members of the International Society for the Psychological Treatments of the Schizophrenias and Other Psychoses (www.isps.org) have just voted, by an overwhelming majority, to change the society’s name to the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis. The new logo and letterhead are to be adopted by the end of March.

The change comes at a time when the scientific validity of the term schizophrenia is being hotly debated in the lead up to the publication of the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (see http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com).

ISPS promotes psychological treatments for persons who experience psychosis (e.g. hallucinations and delusions), and greater understanding of the psychological and social causes of psychosis. Founded in 1956, ISPS now has branches in 19 countries, has its own scientific journal, Psychosis (www.tandf.co.uk/journals/rpsy) and has published 13 books in the last decade. Members include psychiatrists, psychologists, psychoanalysts, nurses, occupational therapists, family therapists and academic researchers, as well as users of mental health services and family members.

In debates preceding the vote the two primary reasons put forward in favour of the change were that the term ‘schizophrenia’ is unscientific and stigmatizing. It was pointed out that the construct has little or no reliability (the extent to which experts can agree on who meets criteria for a diagnosis) or validity (the construct’s ability to predict things like prognosis or treatment responsivity). Research has also repeatedly found that ‘schizophrenia’ is one of the most stigmatizing of all psychiatric labels, and promotes unwarranted pessimism about recovery because of the implication that people with this diagnosis suffer from an irreversible ‘brain disease’.

Filed under SMI a isps knafo o p psychiatry psychoanalysis psychopathology psychopharmacology psychosis psychotherapy psychotic research schizophrenia trauma u y mad pride science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical