Serious Mental Illness Blog

An LIU Post Specialty Concentration

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[Article of Interest] Schizophrenia: When Hallucinatory Voices Suppress Real Ones, New Electronic Application May HelpBy Elin Fugelsnes/Else Lie; translation by Glenn Wells/Carol B. Eckmann. Excerpt from the article: "Every one of us hears inner voices or melodies from time to time. The difference between non-afflicted individuals and schizophrenia patients is that the former manage to tune these out better," the professor points out.If patients could learn to stifle inner noise it could have a huge impact on our ability to treat schizophrenia, he states. To this end, Professor Hugdahl’s research group has developed an application that can be used on mobile phones and other simple electronic devices, to help patients improve their filters.Wearing headphones, the patient is exposed to simple speech sounds with different sounds played in each ear. The task is to practice hearing the sound in one ear while blocking out sound in the other. The application has only been tested on two patients with schizophrenia so far. The response from these patients is promising, Dr Hugdahl relates."The voices are still there, but the test subjects feel that they have control over the voices instead of the other way around. The patient feels it is a breakthrough since it means he can actively shift his focus from the inner voices over to the sounds coming from the outside," the professor explains.

[Article of Interest] Schizophrenia: When Hallucinatory Voices Suppress Real Ones, New Electronic Application May Help
By Elin Fugelsnes/Else Lie; translation by Glenn Wells/Carol B. Eckmann.

Excerpt from the article: "Every one of us hears inner voices or melodies from time to time. The difference between non-afflicted individuals and schizophrenia patients is that the former manage to tune these out better," the professor points out.

If patients could learn to stifle inner noise it could have a huge impact on our ability to treat schizophrenia, he states. To this end, Professor Hugdahl’s research group has developed an application that can be used on mobile phones and other simple electronic devices, to help patients improve their filters.

Wearing headphones, the patient is exposed to simple speech sounds with different sounds played in each ear. The task is to practice hearing the sound in one ear while blocking out sound in the other. The application has only been tested on two patients with schizophrenia so far. The response from these patients is promising, Dr Hugdahl relates.

"The voices are still there, but the test subjects feel that they have control over the voices instead of the other way around. The patient feels it is a breakthrough since it means he can actively shift his focus from the inner voices over to the sounds coming from the outside," the professor explains.

Filed under SMI schizophrenia Science Daily serious mental illness psychosis hallucination voice mad madness crazy psychiatry psychoanalysis psychotic psychotherapy science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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[Article of Interest] Psychiatry Manual Drafters Back Down on Diagnoses
By Benedict Carey
The New York Times
Excerpt: The [doctors on a panel revising psychiatry’s diagnostic manual] dropped two diagnoses that they ultimately concluded were not supported by the evidence: “attenuated psychosis syndrome,” proposed to identify people at risk of developing psychosis, and “mixed anxiety depressive disorder,” a hybrid of the two mood problems. They also tweaked their proposed definition of depression to allay fears that the normal sadness people experience after the loss of a loved one, a job or a marriage would not be mistaken for a mental disorder.
“At long last, DSM 5 is correcting itself and has rejected its worst proposals,” said Dr. Allen Frances, a former task force chairman and professor emeritus at Duke University who has been one of the most prominent critics. “But a great deal more certainly needs to be accomplished. Most important are the elimination of other dangerous new diagnoses and the rewriting of all the many unreliable criteria sets.”

[Article of Interest] Psychiatry Manual Drafters Back Down on Diagnoses

By Benedict Carey

The New York Times

Excerpt: The [doctors on a panel revising psychiatry’s diagnostic manual] dropped two diagnoses that they ultimately concluded were not supported by the evidence: “attenuated psychosis syndrome,” proposed to identify people at risk of developing psychosis, and “mixed anxiety depressive disorder,” a hybrid of the two mood problems. They also tweaked their proposed definition of depression to allay fears that the normal sadness people experience after the loss of a loved one, a job or a marriage would not be mistaken for a mental disorder.

“At long last, DSM 5 is correcting itself and has rejected its worst proposals,” said Dr. Allen Frances, a former task force chairman and professor emeritus at Duke University who has been one of the most prominent critics. “But a great deal more certainly needs to be accomplished. Most important are the elimination of other dangerous new diagnoses and the rewriting of all the many unreliable criteria sets.”

Filed under dsm 5 dagnostic mental mad madness psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis depression psychotic psychotherapy psychopharmacology psychopathology knafo anxiety science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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[Article of Interest] Death with Honors: Suicide among Gifted Adolescents
By James R. Delisle, Ph.D.
Department of Teacher Development and Curriculum Studies, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio.
Abstract: The incidence of suicide and suicide attempts among adolescents has increased markedly during the past two decades. Gifted adolescents, often perceived by others as being immune from problems of depression and emotional upheaval because of their high intelligence, have also shown increases in suicidal behaviors. On the basis of current research, the author contends that gifted young people are especially susceptible to suicide attempts. 

[Article of Interest] Death with Honors: Suicide among Gifted Adolescents

By James R. Delisle, Ph.D.

Department of Teacher Development and Curriculum Studies, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio.

Abstract: The incidence of suicide and suicide attempts among adolescents has increased markedly during the past two decades. Gifted adolescents, often perceived by others as being immune from problems of depression and emotional upheaval because of their high intelligence, have also shown increases in suicidal behaviors. On the basis of current research, the author contends that gifted young people are especially susceptible to suicide attempts. 

Filed under suicide intelligence gifted psychiatry knafo serious mental illness mental mental illness crazy creativity Mad madness science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

46 notes

Dopamine: Duality of Desire
Being an ex-drug-addict turned neuroscientist brings a unique insight into the physiological and phenomenological realities of addiction. 
Excerpt: For 10 years I spun in and out of an addiction to opiates (and other drugs) that led to despair, crime, and the loss of everything I valued most—including my place in graduate school. After many failed attempts, I finally quit taking addictive drugs 30 years ago. I reentered grad school, got my PhD in developmental psychology, and became a professor at the University of Toronto, focusing on emotional and personality development. I studied these topics for 13 years, but I never quite understood my own personality development. I came to believe that my theories needed help from neuroscience, and that’s why I switched to research on the emotional brain—my focus for the past decade.
When I was in the throes of intense psychological addiction, my thoughts were continuously (and unpleasantly) drawn to drug imagery. It would be so great to have some now! How can I get some tonight?! But attraction to something you are just about to get feels marvelous. Dopamine-induced engagement turns into a headlong rush of triumph when the goal is finally accessible.
This perspective on the dual nature of attraction helps make sense of addiction. Unsated attraction can be a kind of torture, and addicts may seek drugs to put an end to that torture, more than for the modicum of pleasure drugs actually bestow.

Dopamine: Duality of Desire

Being an ex-drug-addict turned neuroscientist brings a unique insight into the physiological and phenomenological realities of addiction.

Excerpt: For 10 years I spun in and out of an addiction to opiates (and other drugs) that led to despair, crime, and the loss of everything I valued most—including my place in graduate school. After many failed attempts, I finally quit taking addictive drugs 30 years ago. I reentered grad school, got my PhD in developmental psychology, and became a professor at the University of Toronto, focusing on emotional and personality development. I studied these topics for 13 years, but I never quite understood my own personality development. I came to believe that my theories needed help from neuroscience, and that’s why I switched to research on the emotional brain—my focus for the past decade.

When I was in the throes of intense psychological addiction, my thoughts were continuously (and unpleasantly) drawn to drug imagery. It would be so great to have some now! How can I get some tonight?! But attraction to something you are just about to get feels marvelous. Dopamine-induced engagement turns into a headlong rush of triumph when the goal is finally accessible.

This perspective on the dual nature of attraction helps make sense of addiction. Unsated attraction can be a kind of torture, and addicts may seek drugs to put an end to that torture, more than for the modicum of pleasure drugs actually bestow.

Filed under psychiatry psychoanalysis psychotherapy psychotic substance drug abuse neuroscience knafo emotions addiction science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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[Article of Interest] Mental illness link to art and sex
Excerpt: Creativity of some artists is fuelled by the unique world view mental illness can provide, but without the completely debilitating aspects of the condition. Instead, the artists are able to direct their creativity into artistic projects.

[Article of Interest] Mental illness link to art and sex

Excerpt: Creativity of some artists is fuelled by the unique world view mental illness can provide, but without the completely debilitating aspects of the condition. Instead, the artists are able to direct their creativity into artistic projects.

Filed under psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychotic psychotherapy psychopharmacology psychopathology Survivor schizophrenia creativity knafoi science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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Genetic Risk and Stressful Early Infancy Join to Increase Risk for Schizophrenia

"Our study suggests that if people have a single genetic risk factor alone or a traumatic environment in very early childhood alone, they may not develop mental disorders like schizophrenia," says Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurology and member of the Institute for Cell Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

"But the findings also suggest that someone who carries the genetic risk factor and experiences certain kinds of stress early in life may be more likely to develop the disease."

Filed under psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychotic psychotherapy psychopathology serious mental illness mental madness mad schizophrenia science daily hopkins knafo neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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ISPS List of the Top 20 Papers on Schizophrenia and Psychoses

The International Society for the Psychological Treatments of the Schizophrenias and Other Psychoses's list of the Top 20 papers on the psychological treatments of the schizophrenias and other psychoses:

  1. Wayne S. Fenton and Thomas McGlashan: We can talk: Individual Psychotherapy for Schizophrenia . Am J Psychiatry 154:11, November 1997
  2. Veikko Tähkä: Psychotherapy as phase-specific interaction: Towards a general psychoanalytic theory of psychotherapy. Scand. Psychoanal. Rev. (1979) 2, 113
  3. Frieda Fromm-Reichmann: The academic lecture – Psychotherapy of schizophrenia.  Am J Psychiatry 111: 410, 1954
  4. Susan M. Hingely: Psychodynamic perspectives on psychosis and psychotherapy I: Theory. British Journal of Medical Psychology (1997), 70, 301-312
  5. Susan M. Hingely: Psychodynamic perspectives on psychosis and psychotherapy II: Practice. British Journal of Medical Psychology (1997), 70, 313-324
  6. Silvano Arieti: Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia: New or Revised Procedures. American Journal of Psychotherapy, Vol. XXXIV, No. 4, October 1980
  7. Yrjö O. Alanen: Vulnerability to Schizophrenia and Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Schizophrenic Patients: Towards an Integrated View. Psychiatry, Vol. 60, Summer 1997
  8. Alberta B. Szalita-Pemow: The “intuitive process” and its relation to work with schizophrenics. Journ. of American Psychoanal. Ass. 1955, vol 3, no 1
  9. Ralph R. Greenson and Milton Wexler: The non-transference relationship in the psychoanalytic situation. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 1997, Vol. 28, No 5, 448-456
  10. John Read: Child Abuse and Psychosis: A Literature Review and Implications for Professional Practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 1997, Vol. 28, No 5, 448-456
  11. Thomas McGlashan: Long-term psychotherapy with schizophrenia. American Psychiatric Association, 1988. Paper read at Schizophrenia Days, Stavanger, Norway, 1989
  12. Christopher Bollas: Expressive use of countertransference; notes to the patient from oneself. Contemporary psychoanalysis, Vol. 19, No 1 (1983)
  13. Luc Ciompi: The concept of affect-logic: an integrated psycho-socio-biological approach to the understanding and treatment of schiziphrenia and related disorders. Psychiatry, Vol. 60, Summer 1997
  14. Ian R. H. Falloon: Early intervention in first episode schizophrenia – a preliminary study. Psychiatry, Vol 55, February 1992
  15. Hogarty GE, Kornblith SJ, Greenwald D, DiBarry AL, Cooley S, Ulrich RF, Carter M, Flesher S. Three-year trials of personal therapy among schizophrenic patients living with or independent of family, I: Description of study and effects on relapse rates. Am J Psychiatry 1997 Nov;154(11):1504-13
  16. G. Benedetti: Basic features in the realtionship between therapist and patient. “Klinische Psychotherapie”, G. Bendetti, Huber, Bern, 1964
  17. Sandor Ferenczi: The confusion of tongues between adults and the child. In “ Final contributions to the problems and methods of psychanalysis” (1933). London, Karnac, 156-167
  18. TK Larsen and Stein Opjordsmoen: Early identification and treatment of schizophrenia; conceptual and ethical consideratons. Psychiatry, 1996; 59: 37-380
  19. Karon Bertram P and VandenBos Gary: Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia: The Treatment of Choice. Jason Aronson, Inc 1981
  20. Burnham Donald L: Separation anxiety. A A factor in the objectrelationship of patients with schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry 13:346-358, 1965

Filed under Mad depression isps knafo madness psychiatry psychoanalysis psychosis psychotherapy psychotic schizophrenia psychopharmacology mental neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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Longer-Duration Psychotherapy Appears More Beneficial For Treatment Of Complex Mental Disorders

Psychodynamic psychotherapy lasting for at least a year is effective and superior to shorter-term therapy for patients with complex mental disorders such as personality and chronic mental disorders.

Filed under psychoanalysis psychopharmacology psychosis psychopathology psychiatry serious mental illness psychotherapy personality disorder mental neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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[Book of Interest] Crazy Like Us: The Globalization of the American Psyche

From the New York Times review: The Idea that our Western conception of mental health and illness might be shaping the expression of illnesses in other cultures is rarely discussed in the professional literature. Many modern mental-health practitioners and researchers believe that the scientific standing of our drugs, our illness categories and our theories of the mind have put the field beyond the influence of endlessly shifting cultural trends and beliefs. After all, we now have machines that can literally watch the mind at work. We can change the chemistry of the brain in a variety of interesting ways and we can examine DNA sequences for abnormalities. The assumption is that these remarkable scientific advances have allowed modern-day practitioners to avoid the blind spots and cultural biases of their predecessors.

Filed under psychoanalysis psychopharmacology psychosis psychopathology eating disorder knafo serious mental illness western research mad madness apa mental neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

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Rethinking Madness: A Webinar Presented by Dr. Paris Williams

The upcoming webinar will cover:

  • Common factors associated with onset, deepening, and recovery from psychosis; a way to make some sense out of the anomalous experiences occurring within psychosis; lasting personal paradigm shifts that often occur as a result of going through a psychotic process; and some lasting harms and benefits of this process.
  • Ways to support those struggling with psychotic experiences while also coming to appreciate the important ways that these individuals can contribute to society.
  • A deeper sense of appreciation for the profound wisdom and resilience that lie within all of our beings, even those we may think of as being deeply disturbed.
  • That by gaining a deeper understanding of madness, we gain a deeper understanding of the core existential dilemmas with which we all must struggle, arriving at the unsettling realization of just how thin the boundary really is between madness and sanity.

Filed under psychoanalysis psychopharmacology psychosis psychopathology psychiatry rethinking madness schizophrenia psychotic mad madness apa mental neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical

3 notes

lightweight-daydream asked: Hey thanks for the follow. What is this blog about exactly? Just mental health articles and links?

Hi there! Put simply, we’re trying to offer information and resources on mental illness for people interested or affected by it, without pushing a particular stance on treatment or interpretation.

Filed under neuroscience science psychology dsm diagnostic statistical